Limerick economy ahead of target - CE Conn Murray tells gathering of international business academics

Tuesday 6th October 2015: Limerick is very much one of the bright lights of the recovering Irish economy and already ahead of targets for its own ambitious 2030 Economic Plan, Limerick City and County Council CE Conn Murray told business leaders as he opened the International Clusters Conference in the city.

Publish Date: Tuesday 6th October 2015

Limerick is very much one of the bright lights of the recovering Irish economy and already ahead of targets for its own ambitious 2030 Economic Plan, Limerick City and County Council CE Conn Murray told business leaders as he opened the International Clusters Conference in the city.

Speaking to one of the most high powered audiences of global business academics – over half of the 200 strong attendance travelled from abroad - ever assembled here, Mr Murray said that Limerick’s economic performance has surpassed all hopes and expectations over the past three years.

“Our Limerick 2030 Economic and Spatial plan was launched in 2013 with a target of creating 12,000 jobs within the timeframe of the plan. Some questioned were we being too ambitious but just over two years later we are almost half way there, with 5,872 jobs announced for the city and county in the interim,” he explained. 

“The bulk of these posts will be filled by the end of next year and the last of them by 2019, by which time I am confident that we will have had many, many more,” he said. “It’s an impressive rebound and one that may well even be unrivalled outside of the capital. There’s much for us to be confident of and proud about today.”

Mr Murray said that the very fact that Limerick managed to win the conference illustrates the level of intent and, indeed, innovation there is today in this city and county and having delegates from across the globe was an opportunity to tell the Limerick success story.

Conn Murray, Chief Executive, Limerick City and County Council, left, and Dr Christian Ketels, Principal Associate, Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness, Harvard Business School, during the International Cluster conference in association with Innovate Limerick. Photo: Diarmuid Greene/Fusionshooters

 

He said, “Limerick is a place that has come through a very difficult period, one in which we were disproportionately burdened by the fall-out from the economic collapse here in Ireland from 2007 onwards and ongoing social issues, particularly in the more densely populated areas of the city itself."

“But we have very much turned a corner and now Limerick is a city and county on its way up. Why? Principally we have used the recessionary years to address some of the issues that held us back before, even in the boom times. We have used that period to steady the ship, to charter a course ahead and we have most definitely now set sail on that course and the horizon is looking really good."

“It’s been a transformation of many parts here, all now coming together in a collective resource and with an energy that is going to drive our economy on in the years ahead.  We have a collective vision for our city and region, we have a collective belief in our capacity to achieve that vision and we have a collective determination to deliver results."

The evidence to support these assertions, he said, are demonstrated in actions over recent years, citing the amalgamation of Limerick City and County Councils, the development of the Limerick 2030 Plan and the €300m Limerick Regeneration Plan as examples directly under the remit of the local authority.

Outside this remit, the collective strengths emerge across a region with Limerick as its capital.  This includes the rebirth of Shannon Airport, exponential growth and investment plans for UL, LIT and Mary Immaculate College and the ambition shown by Shannon Foynes Port Company with its masterplan and growth.

Delegates during the International Cluster conference in association with Innovate Limerick. Photo: Diarmuid Greene/Fusionshooters

 

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